Question: Is It OK To Say Mental Illness?

How do you describe someone with mental illness?

Rather than describe the person as being a disease (‘Rhys is schizophrenic’ or ‘Margot is a depressive’), describe the person as experiencing/having mental illness (e.g.

‘Margot has depression’) just as you would someone with any other form of illness/injury (e.g.

‘Doug has cancer’)..

Does language matter in mental illness?

The words you use to write about mental health are very important, and can help reduce stigma around mental illness if carefully chosen. Focus on the person, not the condition.

What is a mental breakdown?

A nervous breakdown (also called a mental breakdown) is a term that describes a period of extreme mental or emotional stress. The stress is so great that the person is unable to perform normal day-to-day activities.

How can we stop Ableism language?

The best rule is to use the terminology preferred by the person or group being addressedDon’t use terms that describe disabilities in phrases that rely on these terms’ negative and ableist connotations. … Don’t use words referring to disabilities and conditions in ways that perpetuate ableist assumptions.More items…•

Why is it called mental health?

In the post-WWII years, references to mental hygiene were gradually replaced by the term ‘mental health’ due to its positive aspect that evolves from the treatment of illness to preventive and promotive areas of healthcare.

What is the most painful mental illness?

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has long been believed to be the one psychiatric disorder that produced the most intense emotional pain, agony, and distress in those who suffer with this condition. Studies have shown that borderline patients experience chronic and significant emotional suffering and mental agony.

What can I say instead of crazy?

preposterouspreposterous. It’s possible that you think something is crazy, when, really, it’s just topsy-turvy. If that’s the case, you might want to reach for the word preposterous instead. Preposterous means “absolutely contrary to nature, reason, or common sense.” As an added bonus, it’s kind of a funny-sounding word.

What is Ableist language?

Ableist language is language that is offensive to people with disability. … Many derogatory words for people with disability – like ‘retard’, ‘moron’ and ‘idiot’ – began as medical definitions used to categorise people with disability as lesser humans.

Is Bonkers a real word?

“Bonkers,” coming as it does from the verb “bonk,” has a certain zaniness written into it, suggesting craziness of a decidedly whimsical strain. “Fans went bonkers when their team won” is how Merriam-Webster uses the word in a sentence.

How do I report a Neighbour with mental illness?

Call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 if you suspect criminal activity. Call NSW Mental Health Triage Services on 1800 011 511 if you are worried about someone’s mental health. Call the Community Justice Centre on 1800 990 777 if you would like help to sort out a neighbour dispute.

What can I say instead of mental illness?

Don’t say “mentally disabled,” “mentally handicapped,” or “mentally ill.” Say, “has a mental illness.” It can also be appropriate to say “mental health condition,” since many people who deal with mental health concerns may not have a formal diagnosis or a full-fledged illness.

What are the 5 signs of mental illness?

The five main warning signs of mental illness are as follows:Excessive paranoia, worry, or anxiety.Long-lasting sadness or irritability.Extreme changes in moods.Social withdrawal.Dramatic changes in eating or sleeping pattern.

What triggers mental illness?

Certain factors may increase your risk of developing a mental illness, including: A history of mental illness in a blood relative, such as a parent or sibling. Stressful life situations, such as financial problems, a loved one’s death or a divorce. An ongoing (chronic) medical condition, such as diabetes.

What to do with someone who is mentally unstable?

There are some general strategies that you can use to help:Listen without making judgements and concentrate on their needs in that moment.Ask them what would help them.Reassure and signpost to practical information or resources.Avoid confrontation.Ask if there is someone they would like you to contact.More items…